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Thread: 64-bit Cygwin

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    64-bit Cygwin

    I found that there is a development version of native 64-bit Cygwin available. I was able to install it and use it to compile 64-bit executables, which I never figured out how to do with the 32-bit Cygwin.

    http://cygwin.com/ml/cygwin/2013-05/msg00232.html

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    Programmer Bulat Ziganshin's Avatar
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    are you sure that you need it (full linux api compatibility) rather than mingw64 (gcc for win api)?

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    Possibly not. I don't know a whole lot about mingw. I've tried installing it under Cygwin and using it, but I didn't get very far with it. I'll give it another try.

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    It looks like its purpose is to be a free compiler for Windows rather than something that would easily compile code developed in a POSIX environment. I have access to VS2010, so I'm wondering if it's any easier than that. I have little familiarity with the Windows API.

    Actually, now I recall that a few years back I was trying to write a Windows application, and I was using MinGW as the compiler. It seemed to be suited to writing code specifically for Windows, especially if you didn't have VS.

    Cygwin seems like it might be easier for my current purposes, which is making quick binaries for the convenience of people on Windows. I share everything as source code.

    By the way, is there a good resource out there on Windows programming in C or C++?

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    Programmer Bulat Ziganshin's Avatar
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    google. it finds anyhing either in msdn or stackoverflow

    cygwin is a library that mimics POSIX APIs on Windows. it's great for quick porting Unix programs to Windows but they will remain alien things here. Mingw is for Windows native development using GCC toolchain. It's better to use Mingw and OS-independent APIs to keep program portable. Program developed with Mingw can be compiled with MSVC/ICL too (once we omit gcc-only features). i suggest using this precompiled package https://sourceforge.net/projects/mingwbuilds/ that provides 64/32-bit compiler: https://sourceforge.net/projects/min...dows/releases/

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    Well, cygwin is more of an environment than anything else. I use it as my regular command line as I cannot stand the windows shell. That being said, MinGW is definitely better for compiling stuff.

    On a different note, the cygwin installer does include a MinGW toolchain which I have not yet figured out how to use. My last attempt at using it caused the cygwin dll to still be required.

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    I put C:\cygwin\bin in my PATH so I can use familiar Linux commands like wc, diff, make, etc. from a Windows command line. I just have to remember when to use forward slashes and back slashes depending on the command.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mangix View Post
    On a different note, the cygwin installer does include a MinGW toolchain which I have not yet figured out how to use. My last attempt at using it caused the cygwin dll to still be required.
    I had trouble with it, too. I didn't spend much time at it, though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Mahoney View Post
    I put C:\cygwin\bin in my PATH so I can use familiar Linux commands like wc, diff, make, etc. from a Windows command line. I just have to remember when to use forward slashes and back slashes depending on the command.
    The bash shell itself is very handy, especially for writing one-line scripts. Cygwin seems to be slow at forking processes, which makes it less usable than under Linux or OSX. I've been on a Mac at my last two jobs, and at home I run Linux in a VM for doing development. The VM can be inconvenient, but there are also advantages. For instance, you can make a complete copy and move it to another machine.

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